Welcome to DNA Ancestor Communities! Here you can learn about your own ancestry as well as explore wide-ranging topics such as genetics, genealogy, and world history. We have ten DNA Ancestry forums, including several found nowhere else, such as Melungeon, Romani, and Cherokee. You may read any posts in any forum but to reply or start a new thread you must register. Please click at the top right corner to register or log in.

If you're not sure where to start, register, choose a forum, and jump in. DNA Ancestor Communities is for everyone, from novice to expert. Our experienced moderators will be happy to guide you during your search for answers and information, and of course everyone likes to hear personal stories. Come on in!

Poland DNA

Moderators: dpyates, jakayj, DNAadministrator, dnacommunities, teresapy

D J Thornton
Posts: 296
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:58 am

Poland DNA

Postby D J Thornton » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:34 am

Ancient DNA Reveals Matrilineal Continuity in Present- Day Poland over the Last Two Millennia

https://curis.ku.dk/ws/files/139031619/ ... 110839.pdf

Abstract
While numerous ancient human DNA datasets from across Europe have been published till date, modern-day Poland in particular, remains uninvestigated. Besides application in the reconstruction of continent-wide human history, data from this region would also contribute towards our understanding of the history of the Slavs, whose origin is hypothesized to be in East or Central Europe. Here, we present the first population-scale ancient human DNA study from the region of modern- day Poland by establishing mitochondrial DNA profiles for 23 samples dated to 200 BC – 500 AD (Roman Iron Age) and for 20 samples dated to 1000–1400 AD (Medieval Age). Our results show that mitochondrial DNA sequences from both periods belong to haplogroups that are characteristic of contemporary West Eurasia. Haplotype sharing analysis indicates that majority of the ancient haplotypes are widespread in some modern Europeans, including Poles. Notably, the Roman Iron Age samples share more rare haplotypes with Central and Northeast Europeans, whereas the Medieval Age samples share more rare haplotypes with East-Central and South-East Europeans, primarily Slavic populations. Our data demonstrates genetic continuity of certain matrilineages (H5a1 and N1a1a2) in the area of present-day Poland from at least the Roman Iron Age until present. As such, the maternal gene pool of present-day Poles, Czechs and Slovaks, categorized as Western Slavs, is likely to have descended from inhabitants of East-Central Europe during the Roman Iron Age.

Return to “Europe”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests