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Treaty Wyandots, Shawnees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws and Kaska

Moderators: dpyates, jakayj, DNAadministrator, dnacommunities, teresapy, D J Thornton

D J Thornton
Posts: 294
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:58 am

Treaty Wyandots, Shawnees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws and Kaska

Postby D J Thornton » Mon May 14, 2018 11:59 am

In looking for connections to my Early , SC, GA, AL Adams, I came across this info
One of the sons of Godfrey Adams 1880 Census stated FA VA, MO Ohio
Found under Godfrey a few notes . The Quaker Families of Bush River went to Ohio so Slaves could be free.Among these families many familiar surnames among the
AL families of mine And among Indians, William Cooper, John Brooks, Frances Godfrey
This is early 1820*30 where some families are lost in transit from Ga to Al
ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY.

The land lying south of the boundary road, in Jay County, was ceded to the United States by the Indians in a Treaty made at Greenville, Ohio, August 3, 1795. The line began at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River, and, after various windings, reached Fort Recovery, and proceeded " southwesterly in a direct line to the Ohio River, so as to intercept it opposite the mouth of the Kentucky or Cuttawa River."

This treaty was signed, on the part of the United States, by Major General Anthony Wayne, and by the Indians, by the chiefs of the following tribes: "Wyandots, Shawnees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws and Kaskaskias.

The land lying north of this boundary line was ceded to the United States by the Indians in a Treaty made at St. Mary's, Ohio, October 6, 1818. It was between Jonathan Jennings, Lewis Cass and Benjamin Parke, Commissioners of the United States, and the Chiefs of the Miami nation of Indians, viz : Peshawa or Eichardville, Osas, Ketauga or Charley, and others. In this Treaty many reservations were made by the Indians, two of which were in Jay, as follows: "One reservation of two miles square on the Salimonie River, at the mouth of Atchepongqwawe Creek," (now called Butternut, from the butternut trees growing along its banks). The other reserves "to Francois Godfrey six sections of land on the Salimonie River, at a place called Lapetite Prairie." The two mile reservation on Butternut Creek was ceded to the United States by the Miami tribe of Indians, in a Treaty made October 23, 1834, at the forks of the Wabash, below Huntington.

JAY COUNTY HISTORY ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY ... lying south of the boundary road, in Jay County, was ceded to the United States ... the Indians, two of which were in Jay, as follows: "One reservation of two miles ... its banks). The other reserves "to Francois Godfrey six sections of land on the Salimonie ... other purposes," by which the counties of Jay, Adams, "Wells, DeKalb, Steuben, Whitley, Kosciusko, Fulton ... to be known by the name of Jay; beginning at the southeast corner of Adams ... best days in the northern part of Indiana, and who finally fell a victim to ... be ascertained who gave the name of Jay to this county. Some member of the ... as early as May, 1835. John Jay, in honor of whom the county ... repeated narration of similar occurrences. History of Jay County, Indiana By M. W. Montgomery Return To The
genealogytrails
Early the next morning they set out for the Indian village, on the banks of the Salimonie, ot twenty or thirty huts. The Indians were of the Miami tribe, and Francois Godfrey their chief. A few years afterward he built a brick house there, and since then it has generally been known as the "Godfrey Farm." The Indians left in 1834, and the farm is now owned by a resident of Kentucky. They reached this town about sunset. The Indians were very kind, and gave them a camp to sleep in that night. On Wednesday morning they crossed the Salimonie to their home, three quarters of a mile distant. This consisted of two cabins, built by John Gain—one for a dwelling, and the other to keep articles in for traffic with the Indians. They were situated on the low bank of a small prairie. ~No ground was cleared around the cabins, but the men immediately set to work and cleared seven acres. Mary Brooks, naturally industrious, energetic and cheerful, looked about her and went to work. Though twenty-four miles from any white family, surrounded by forests and savages, yet for the sake of pleasing her husband, whom she devotedly loved, she resolved to be contented.
,Georgia Marriages, Georgia Genealogy Trails
Hancock co, GA to Indiana V., eldest daughter of J. J. Griffin, Esq., ... Marshall of Savannah, GA to Miss Eliza Knight Godfrey of Savannah, GA by Rev. Geo. G. N
genealogytrails

Bush River Quakers, Newberry County, South Carolina Genealogy Trails
River began a migration to Ohio. Between 1802 and 1807 more than ... Hannaueel, Mark, Achsah, Gary and Hiram; James Jay and wife, Jemimah, and children, Mills, Alexander ... Monthly Meeting and West Branch Monthly Meeting, Ohio, Friends appointed to produce them to next ... for the following: To Miami Monthly Meeting, Ohio: Richard Thompson; Thomas Hart; Elijah Mendenhall and ... Amos.To West Branch Monthly Meeting, Ohio; Bales Butler and wife and children, ... Bush River: To Miami Monthly Meeting Ohio; William Hollingsworth; Richard Moore; David Jay; Joseph Hollingsworth; Exile Pearson; Dempsey Moore ... 4-23-1765 Page 39 John Jay, Elizabeth Jay Ch: Jessy b. 12-8-1773 ... 1-12-1784 Page 34 William Jay, Mary Jay Ch: John b. 10-26-1752 ... dis mou.ARNOLD.1804, 8,—. Mary Jay & dt, Rachel Arnold, gc.ATKINSON.1807
genealogytrails



During the last half of the eighteenth century four principal centers of Quakerism arose in South Carolina and one in Georgia.   These were in Kershaw, Marlborough, Newberry and Union Counties, South Carolina, and in Columbia (now McDuffie) County, Georgia,   The earliest of these settlements appears to have been in Kershaw County, S. C, about 1750.   Fredericksburg Monthly Meeting, also called Wateree, was set up in this county about 1755 or earlier.   The monthly meeting was laid down about 1782, and the meetings for worship disappeared not long afterward. No records of Fredericksburg Monthly Meeting are known to be in existence.

Bush River Monthly Meeting, in Newberry County, S. C, was established in 1770; Wrightsborough Monthly Meeting, in Georgia, 1773; Cane Creek Monthly Meeting, in Union County, S. C, 1799; Piney Grove Monthly Meeting, in Marlborough County, S. C, 1802.

Bush River Meeting w

About 1802, moved by a desire to live in a country where no slaves were held, Friends of Bush River began a migration to Ohio

Jay County was formed in 1836.
It is the only county in the United States named for John Jay,
co-author of the Federalist Papers,
Secretary of Foreign Affairs under the Articles of Confederation,
and first Chief Justice of the United States. John Jay died in 1829
Colonel John Vawter, of Jennings County, was Chairman of a Committee in the House of Representatives, of the Legislature of 1835-6, that introduced a bill, which passed and was approved February 7th, 1835, entitled "an act laying out all the unorganized territory, to which the Indian title has been extinguished, in the State, into a suitable number of counties, and for other purposes," by which the counties of Jay, Adams, "Wells, DeKalb, Steuben, Whitley, Kosciusko, Fulton, Marshall, Stark, Pulaski, Jasper, Newton and Porter were al lau' out.

The following is section third of that act:

That all the territory included within the following boundary lines shall constitute and form a county, to be known by the name of Jay; beginning at the southeast corner of Adams County, thence west to the eastern boundary of Grant County, thence south to the northern boundary of Delaware, thence east with the northern boundary of said county, to the north-east corner of the same, thence south to the north-west corner of Randolph County, thence east with the northern boundary of said county, to the State line, thence north to the place of beginning.

D J Thornton
Posts: 294
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:58 am

Re: Treaty Wyandots, Shawnees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws and K

Postby D J Thornton » Mon May 14, 2018 12:17 pm

Some of those early families were also a Melungeon and Indians
was Hamilton Gibson. He was building a cabin for his father's ("William Gibson's,) family. William W. Dole, Peter Studabaker and three others from Fort Recovery helped raise the cabin, which was the third one in W abash Township. The next month William Gibson and his family came, his daughter Jane, now the wife of Samuel Arbaugh, being the housekeeper, her mother having died in Ohio. After Hamilton was married and had fifteen acres cleared, a man attempted to enter the land, and Bo cheat him out of his improvements. This was a common and shameful method by which speculators defrauded the industrious early settlers out of their homes and the fruits of their labor. A friend loaned him $50, and without one cent to pay his expenses, he went on foot to Fort Wayne, and saved his home.


Mr. John James, of Randolph County, was one of the Commissioners to lay out the State road from Richmond to Fort Wayne, and Jer. Smith, was his Surveyor. In September, 1832, while making the survey, they camped on the north side of the Little Salimonie, where the road now crosses it, probably attracted by the beautiful grove, which is now owned by Mr. Jonas Votaw. Here they were visited by Philip Brown, of whom they obtained "roasting ears" and squashes. They called him "Governor of the State of Salimonie," which cognomen he wore while he lived. They continued the survey across the Wabash. Previous to this they had surveyed the road on another route, which passed two miles west of Portland. When they reached the Loblolly, Mr. James declared it would swamp a black snake, went back and surveyed the road now passing through Portland.


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