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Jewish markers with Iberian background

Moderators: jakayj, DNAadministrator, dnacommunities, teresapy, dpyates

Raven
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:31 am

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby Raven » Tue Dec 15, 2015 12:04 pm

Is Spanish-Majorcan a Sephardic Jewish match?

DNAadministrator
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:16 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby DNAadministrator » Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:34 pm

Yes, it is. I will be free all day tomorrow (Wednesday) to discuss with you. Is there a good time for you or another day?

Sue

ymidualc
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:01 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby ymidualc » Tue Jan 26, 2016 12:52 am

Hi!
I'm New here.I have two jewish markers.
Jewish I & III.

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dpyates
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:17 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby dpyates » Tue Jan 26, 2016 1:23 am

Welcome to the Jewish Forum. Which two Jewish markers do you have. I can tell you more when I see whether you got one checkmark or two under Jewish I, II, III or IV.
Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, http://dnaconsultants.com

Raven
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:31 am

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby Raven » Tue Jan 26, 2016 12:07 pm

I received one Jewish 1 marker and one Jewish ll marker.

ymidualc
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:01 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby ymidualc » Tue Jan 26, 2016 5:10 pm

Thank you Dr.Yates.
I have jewish I and jewish III markers.
I have jewish ancestry history.

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dpyates
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:17 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby dpyates » Tue Jan 26, 2016 6:38 pm

Do you have one checkmark or two for Jewish I? And for Jewish II?
Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, http://dnaconsultants.com

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dpyates
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:17 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby dpyates » Tue Jan 26, 2016 6:44 pm

Here is an information page for Majorcan Jews - Chueta (n=102) as a population match in our method: http://dnaconsultants.com/dnapops/majorcan-jews.

It is interesting to note that Israeli courts have specifically acknowledged Majorcan Chuetas as having the right of return:

"Rabbinical Court Recognizes"

http://dnaconsultants.com/_blog/DNA_Con ... s_as_Jews/
Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, http://dnaconsultants.com

Raven
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:31 am

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby Raven » Tue Jan 26, 2016 9:35 pm

I have one check mark for Jewish 1 and also only 1 check mark for Jewish 2.

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dpyates
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:17 pm

Re: Jewish markers with Iberian background

Postby dpyates » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:02 pm

This means you received a Jewish I marker from one parent and a Jewish III from one parent (not necessarily the same parent). The most you can say is that you have Jewish ancestry from one parent, possibly both.

The difference between Jewish I and Jewish III is explained in the report:

JEWISH. These markers do not necessarily point to Jewish ancestry but can also signal ancestry in any of the places where Jews historically lived due to Jews’ admixture with local populations, conversion, identity loss and the phenomenon of crypto-Judaism. Still, statistics show that over 80% of modern-day Jews have one or more markers. They are sensitive for both major branches of Judaism, Ashkenazi and Sephardic, or Spanish, Jews. Ashkenazi Jews (“German,” in Hebrew) started out in the Rhineland and northern France following the collapse of the Roman Empire. During the Age of Charlemagne around 800 they began to settle eastward as the lands of the Central and Eastern European Slavs were conquered by the Franks and Germans. There they met the Turkic Khazar people moving in from the Caucasus region. They reached a high point in their development in seventeenth-century Poland, Lithuania, Silesia, the Ukraine, Russia and Romania. During Germany’s Third Reich, six million or more of them were killed in the Holocaust. In contemporary times, they represent perhaps the best-known face of Judaism, accounting for about 80% of American and Israeli Jews. Because they trace back to a small nucleus (founder effect or bottlenecking) which kept expanding while preserving the same gene pool (genetic drift), Ashkenazi Jews have very recognizable genetic traits. They are subject to a range of hereditary disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease. As in the case of other markers, Jewish I, II and III are not completely conclusive in showing ancestry, nor do they tell you how much you may have or where in your genealogies it may stem from.
JEWISH I. This is the most common of the three markers. It can occur without known Jewish ancestry for a variety of reasons including an ancestor’s conversion to Christianity during the centuries of persecutions against Jews in Europe. Its frequency is highest in Poles, Russians, Germans, Hungarians, Romanians and Slavic peoples who intermarried with Ashkenazi Jews. It also appears in Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan Jews (Sephardim).
JEWISH II. This marker is the strongest. It is found in Jewish families who have intermarried with other Jews down through the centuries. It is characteristic of Ashkenazi Jews.
JEWISH III. This marker is an indication of Middle Eastern roots. Preserved by Jews, it is also borne by Kurds, Syrians, Arabs, Berbers, Basques, Turks, Greeks, Italians and other populations from the ancient world. It is particularly common in Sephardic Jews.
JEWISH IV. A marker indicative of Tatar or Khazar heritage. Khazars were a Central Asian people of Turkic, Hunnish and Iranian elements that arose in the Caucasus region. After converting to Judaism in the early Middle Ages, they moved westward into Russia and the Ukraine under pressure from Islam, eventually becoming a large component of Eastern and Central European Jewry. Many Ashkenazi Jews now find they have some Khazar (or intermingled Tatar) ancestry.
Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, http://dnaconsultants.com


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