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Excerpt from the twenty and odd, First Slave Ship

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D J Thornton
Posts: 203
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:58 am

Excerpt from the twenty and odd, First Slave Ship

Postby D J Thornton » Sat Jan 27, 2018 12:53 am

Excerpt from "Unveiked" the twenty and odd, first Africans at Jamestown

http://kinfolkdetective.com/841-2

The San Juan Bautista’s battle against the two English corsairs, the Treasurer and the White Lion. ... The ship was originally called Date Maru. ... The San Juan Bautista returned to Uraga on August 15, 1615.


I didn't know this was a Japanese built ship.

D J Thornton
Posts: 203
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:58 am

Re: Excerpt from the twenty and odd, First Slave Ship

Postby D J Thornton » Sat Jan 27, 2018 12:58 am

http://kinfolkdetective.com/first-afric ... h-america/

In early 1619, the Kingdom of Ndongo in the Central Mountains of Angola, under siege by the Portuguese Governor Luis Mendes de Vasconcellos, is ransacked and men, women, and children are enslaved and marched to the Port of Luanda to be transported to the silver mines of Mexico.
Of the six slave ships leaving the port of Luanda in the summer of 1619 for the Port of Vera Cruz, only one would report a raid by English pirates. The San Juan Bautista, captained by the Don Manuel Mendez de Acuna.
Just weeks later in mid August 1619 the White Lion arrives with “twenty and odd” Africans. The Captain, carrying a Dutch marque, claims he took them from a floundering Spanish warship.
Documents recently discovered by Historian John Thornton determines they were the Northern Mbundu people who spoke Bantu, from the Kingdom of Ndongo. Only one other possibility exists. There was a report of some Portuguese Christian porters who accidently became caught up in the Imbangala’s slave march to the Port of Luanda, their port of origin and point of sale.


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